Category Archives: Features

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 6

Jadon Gibson

The Lower Towns of the Shawnees stretched along both sides of the Ohio River and was the strangest thing that Mary Ingles had ever seen. The blood-curdling screams of the residents when she arrived with her captors and other prisoners gave her goosebumps and put her in fear for her life and that of her children.

Mary was held in good favor however because of her deeds on the trip following her capture. The chief told her that she and her Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 6

Taking Care of a Loved One Impacts More Than You Think

Jeff Rubin

You don’t have to look far these days to find someone taking care of the wellbeing of a parent, spouse, or friend. You may, in fact, be one of them. If you are, you’ve joined the ranks of approximately 735,000 Kentucky “family caregivers” and some 65 million adults nationwide who have taken on that role. By definition, a family caregiver can be anyone (a relative, friend, or neighbor) who provides assistance related to a primary physical or mental disability and are unpaid for those services. Continue reading Taking Care of a Loved One Impacts More Than You Think

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 5

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles gave birth to a healthy baby daughter on the third night of their journey to the Shawnee Indian town in Ohio following her capture by the Indians on July 5, 1755.

She knew her captors would arise early the following morning and she would have to climb upon the horse and keep up with the procession, not slowing their travel. Her life and that of her children depended on it. Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 5

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 4

Jadon Gibson

Silent prayers helped the pregnant Mary Ingles overcome the perilous days before she won the respect of the Indian chief after her kidnapping on July 8, 1775. He allowed her to ride a horse rather than walk after she demonstrated her value in the Indian camp. Her four-year old, Thomas, sat closely behind her while her two-year old, George, was in front.

The Indians killed her mother and Col. James Patton before burning the Ingles cabin. The Indians also kidnapped Eliza Draper, Mary’s Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 4

Five Takeaways from the Berea Police Department Community Survey

Is Berea perceived to be a safe place to live, work and visit, and is the Berea Police Department effective? Yes on both counts, according to a survey conducted by a research team from Berea College. The team initially distributed 1,600 questionnaires throughout the city last summer, of which about one fourth were fully completed for use in the study. Continue reading Five Takeaways from the Berea Police Department Community Survey

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 3

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles feared for her life and that of her two sons and unborn baby after being kidnapped by Indians on July 8, 1775.
She was distraught over the murder of her mother and her young nephew and the burning of her home. The quick turn of events was like a bad dream to her. It began that afternoon when the Indians attacked her home while the men of Draper’s Meadow were gathering wheat. Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 3

Parks and Recreation, Public Libraries at the Core of Vibrant Communities

Jeff Rubin

Among the many influences that contribute to the quality of life in a community, I can think of two where their impact is often taken for granted, underappreciated or not fully understood. This may be particularly true in smaller communities where options for public engagement in ways that better the mind, as well as the body, may be few and far between. That is where the programs and services available through the many parks and recreation departments and public libraries around the country play a significant role in improving people’s lives. Continue reading Parks and Recreation, Public Libraries at the Core of Vibrant Communities

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 2

Jadon Gibson

It was a time of danger and unrest on the borderland. The latter 1700’s found more and more settlers moving westward causing a great consternation among the Indians. Their ancestors had lived and hunted on the land for many generations. Another negative factor was the influence the French and English brought by inciting the Indians. Lastly the lack of communications in the territory led to individuals not knowing at any particular time if they were at peace or at war. It was a difficult time for all involved. There were atrocities on both sides. Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 2

Mary Ingles, early American heroine

Jadon Gibson

The story about Mary Ingles is one of the most amazing I have ever researched and written. It will tug at your emotions over the next several issues. You’ll find yourself rooting for Mary in a series of spellbinding dangers…and it’s all as true as I could make it.

The Drapers and Ingles were settlers along the Wilderness Road, an early trail leading to the area that would become Kentucky. The vast mountain range masked the wilds Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine

The battle at Wildcat mountain, conclusion

Jadon Gibson

The death of Joe Cameron near the beginning of the Civil War left Molly Cameron to fend for herself and little Jim, her 3-year old son.

Molly left during the third week of October to trade a sack of beans to a distant neighbor. She couldn’t pack little Jim on such a lengthy journey so she woke him early and kept him busy in order to tire him out. He fell asleep and Continue reading The battle at Wildcat mountain, conclusion

The Battle at Wildcat Mountain

Jadon Gibson

Molly Cameron was white with fear as her husband lay unconscious, ailing seriously. It was October of 1861, the early days of the Civil War. The sparse population on Wildcat Mountain in southeast Kentucky near Livingston had heard little about the war.

Understandably so as it had been just a few months since President Lincoln called on the remaining states in the Union to provide volunteers to quell the uprising of the seven states withdrawing from the Union. Kentucky refused to provide men, Continue reading The Battle at Wildcat Mountain

The hanging of Ananias Honeycutt

Jadon Gibson

The public spectacle of Ananias Honeycutt’s hanging in Tazewell, TN on August 12, 1875 and factors regarding the investigation, trial and execution led to the discontinuance of public hangings in Tennessee. Tazewell is the county seat of Claiborne County, located in northeastern Tennessee.

The hanging was witnessed by up to 6,000 people who arrived by horse, wagon or foot from a wide area. Families used the occasion Continue reading The hanging of Ananias Honeycutt

John Rice Irwin and a gift from the heart

Jadon Gibson

It was a pleasure receiving a Christmas well wish from my good friend John Rice Irwin a few days ago. Irwin is the founder of the fabulous Museum of Appalachia which is located just 18 miles or so north of Knoxville just off of Highway 75.

John Rice Irwin is a great American and great Tennessean. His life is rooted in the mountains and hills of Appalachia. A huge number of individuals have visited and enjoyed the Museum of Appalachia. John asked me Continue reading John Rice Irwin and a gift from the heart

By land and by water, conclusion

Jadon Gibson

Richard Henderson selected Col. John Donelson and Cpt. James Robertson to lead settlers into the Cumberland River region in 1779-1780. Robertson led an overland movement westward in late 1779 to establish a settlement at the Bluffs, present-day Nashville. Colonel John Donelson headed a flotilla of forty or more boats carrying a large number of women and children. His own large family, including his wife, their children Continue reading By land and by water, conclusion